Good jobs/bad jobs and the declining middle, 1967-1986
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Good jobs/bad jobs and the declining middle, 1967-1986 by Statistics Canada.

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Published by Statistics Canada, Analytical Studies Branch, 1990. in [Ottawa] .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Skilled labor -- Canada -- Statistics.,
  • Division of labor -- Statistics.,
  • Middle class -- Canada -- Statistics.,
  • Labor and laboring classes -- Canada -- Statistics.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Statementby Garnett Picot, John Myles, Ted Wannell.
SeriesResearch paper series (Statistics Canada) -- no.28
ContributionsMyles, John, 1943-, Wannel, Ted., Picot, W. G., Statistics Canada. Analytical Studies Branch.
The Physical Object
Pagination37 p. :
Number of Pages37
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL17076867M

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